Gluten free flour



When baking there are different types of gluten free flour you can use.

Wheat flour contains gluten which is the protein that strengthens and binds dough in baking. Because of this, when baking with wheat free flours you may need to source alternative binding agents such as guar gum and xantham gum.

Experiment with a gluten free flour as an alternative to wheat. These gluten free all purpose flours are usually blended together in a mix that you can buy pre-packaged or make your own.

  • Amaranth flour
    Amaranth flour is made from the seed of the Amaranth plant, which is a leafy vegetable. Amaranth seeds are very high in protein, which makes a nutritious flour for baking. Alternative names: African spinach, Chinese spinach, Indian spinach, elephants ear.

  • Arrowroot flour
    Arrowroot flour is ground from the root of the plant, and is very useful for thickening recipes. It is tasteless, and the fine powder becomes clear when it is cooked, which makes it ideal for thickening clear sauces.

  • Brown rice flour
    Brown rice flour is heavier than its relative, white rice flour. It is milled from unpolished brown rice so it has a higher nutritional value than white, and as it contains the bran of the brown rice it has a higher fibre content. This also means that it has a noticeable texture, a bit grainy.

  • Barley flour
    Barley only contains a small amount of gluten, so is rarely used to make bread, with the exception of unleavened bread. It has a slightly nutty flavour, and can be used to thicken or flavour soups or stews. Blended with other alternative flours it is also fairly versatile for cakes, biscuits, pastry, dumplings etc.

    Gluten Free Baking Tips

    Gum (xanthan or guar) is the key to successful gluten-free baking. It provides the binding needed to give the baked product proper elasticity, keeping it from crumbling.

    Add 1/2 teaspoon xanthan or guar gum per cup of gluten free flour to make cakes, cookies, bars, muffins and other quick breads. Add 1 teaspoon per cup of flour blend to make yeast bread, pizza dough or other baked items that call for yeast.


    Use a homemade gluten free flour recipe made from these flours

  • Cornmeal
    Ground from corn. Heavier than cornflour, not generally interchangeable in recipes.

  • Potato flour
    This flour should not be confused with potato starch flour. Potato flour has a strong potato flavour and is a heavy flour so a little goes a long way. Bulk buying is not recommended unless you are using it on a very regular basis for a variety of recipes as it does not have a very long shelf life.

  • Potato starch flour
    This is a fine white flour made from potatoes, and has a light potato flavour which is undetectable when used in recipes. It's one of the few alternative flours that keeps very well provided it is stored in an airtight jar, and somewhere cool and dark.

  • Quinoa flour (pronounced 'keen wa')
    Quinoa is related to the plant family of spinach and beets. It has been used for over 5,000 years as a cereal, and the Incas called it the mother seed. Quinoa provides a good source of vegetable protein and it is the seeds of the quinoa plant that are ground to make flour.

  • Sorghum flour This is a relatively new flour on the market.It is ground from sorghum grain, which is similar to millet. The flour is used to make porridge or flat unleavened breads. It is an important staple in Africa and India.

All the recipes on this site are free to use. Either submitted by you or made and tested by me.




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